Tag Archives: black collectivism

Questioning: Pan Africanism, Black Collectivism

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In the past year, my political views have bent toward a more libertarian angle and have thus found a need to question a lot of my previous beliefs.

Currently on the chopping block: pan Africanism, black collectivism.

Pan Africanism – can I admit that I didn’t even consider it a political movement or political theory, it was just the way that people should think – Blacks -worldwide- should be sticking together. Ergo, the fact that this is NOT the reality is cause for a lot of alarm, shame and embarrassment.

But stepping back, gaining a different perspective, I am now able to ask some questions, most pertinent to me is what is the overall goal, what exactly is this global collective suppose to be striving for?

The same questions apply to Black collectivism. One of the most blatant answers I see is that this banding together is meant for protection, against white supremacy, Asian supremacy, Jewish supremacy, etc. Somehow this banding together will produce…some type of paradise on Earth. SOMEHOW. Yeah, that’s about the extent of the general knowledge I have obtained of these movements. Considering that these are movements meant for everyone of a certain skin color I don’t think that these answers should appear so esoteric.

so I’m going to have to dig deeper.

Let’s see what I come up with.

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Shea moisture: When ‘buying black’ goes wrong

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Hey, how about that Shea Moisture commercial that is bound to become a teachable moment in how NOT to properly court a new consumer market without angering your old market.

A lot of the anger is coming from a contingent of consumers who believe in the black centric principle of buying black.

Here’s four teachable lessons for consumers who want to practice the principle of buying black without being burned in the future.

 

  1. “Buying Black ensures that more Black people are employed,” is one of the reasons stated for why it’s important to support Black businesses.
    1. BUYER BEWARE: Do your homework and research the company’s hiring practices.
  2. Black owners may not share your values. (I.E. Blacks are REALLY not a monolith)
    1. BUYER BEWARE: You, dear consumer, may believe in black empowerment, collectivism, etc, but that does not mean that the business owner you are purchasing from believes in reinvestment in the community, hiring more people from the community, etc. As a “woke” consumer, it is your duty to do due diligence to discover where your dollars are likely to be used.