Category Archives: Social issues

Fair Housing for All?

Standard

I attended a panel examining Fair Housing in Atlanta 50+ years after the passage of the Civil Right Act.

Well, it was meant to be a panel examining the growth or lack there of fair, i.e. affordable, housing in the City of Atlanta. As someone who has a very shaky grasp of the history and current situation of housing availability in Atlanta, I couldn’t say that I walked away with much more information than what I began. Words spoken by the panelists acknowledged historical discrimination and current housing injustice, but specific details explaining these words were not given. Instead the panelists quickly moved on to describe how much the institutions they worked for were working hard to address the problem. The panelists included a representative for HUD, the Housing Authority (or soon to be Atlanta Housing, a good marketing move) and two others I cannot remember now.

But the evening wasn’t a waste because it did whet my appetite about learning more about housing in Atlanta. Embarrassingly enough, for several questions that were raised in my mind, I quickly wondered what Thomas Sowell, or Colin (of Colin’s Last Stand) thought. I wanted to be told the answer. But that would be too easy and just a tad pathetic since I knew that once I had their answer I would just parrot what they had to say.

So, I want to actually understand, not just repeat someone else’s conclusions.

Here are the handful of questions that I think are most important to me to begin with:

What is the Fair Housing Act and what part of the Civil Rights Act addresses housing (yes, Dr King hang your head in shame because I honestly don’t know – yet.)

What are the average prices of homes and apartments in City of Atlanta and why are they so expensive?

What happens to those who are displaced by gentrification?

Is it automatically discriminatory for landlords not to choose to accept housing vouchers? why do landlords choose not to accept housing vouchers?

Is an enforced fair housing law effective? (define effective. 😉

Advertisements

Questioning: Pan Africanism, Black Collectivism

Standard

In the past year, my political views have bent toward a more libertarian angle and have thus found a need to question a lot of my previous beliefs.

Currently on the chopping block: pan Africanism, black collectivism.

Pan Africanism – can I admit that I didn’t even consider it a political movement or political theory, it was just the way that people should think – Blacks -worldwide- should be sticking together. Ergo, the fact that this is NOT the reality is cause for a lot of alarm, shame and embarrassment.

But stepping back, gaining a different perspective, I am now able to ask some questions, most pertinent to me is what is the overall goal, what exactly is this global collective suppose to be striving for?

The same questions apply to Black collectivism. One of the most blatant answers I see is that this banding together is meant for protection, against white supremacy, Asian supremacy, Jewish supremacy, etc. Somehow this banding together will produce…some type of paradise on Earth. SOMEHOW. Yeah, that’s about the extent of the general knowledge I have obtained of these movements. Considering that these are movements meant for everyone of a certain skin color I don’t think that these answers should appear so esoteric.

so I’m going to have to dig deeper.

Let’s see what I come up with.

Shea moisture: When ‘buying black’ goes wrong

Standard

Hey, how about that Shea Moisture commercial that is bound to become a teachable moment in how NOT to properly court a new consumer market without angering your old market.

A lot of the anger is coming from a contingent of consumers who believe in the black centric principle of buying black.

Here’s four teachable lessons for consumers who want to practice the principle of buying black without being burned in the future.

 

  1. “Buying Black ensures that more Black people are employed,” is one of the reasons stated for why it’s important to support Black businesses.
    1. BUYER BEWARE: Do your homework and research the company’s hiring practices.
  2. Black owners may not share your values. (I.E. Blacks are REALLY not a monolith)
    1. BUYER BEWARE: You, dear consumer, may believe in black empowerment, collectivism, etc, but that does not mean that the business owner you are purchasing from believes in reinvestment in the community, hiring more people from the community, etc. As a “woke” consumer, it is your duty to do due diligence to discover where your dollars are likely to be used.

Saying no to a black collective

Standard

It’s been a twisted road getting here, but after discarding most of my support of feminism, and a generalized SJWism, I have arrived here – turning away from a path of black collectivism.

I’m tired and feel weird even typing this but I want to go on record and well, record this moment. Also, I want to figure out how on earth I got here.

Maybe it as all building up. Saying good bye to one type of collectivism after another (4th wave feminism, SJWism) so it made sense that I also would say good by to black collectivism for brevity let’s say it happened in three phases.

  1. Feeling obligated to support (i.e. spend money on) movies I didn’t want to see.
    1.  Red Tails, 12 Years a Slave, Roots, most recently Birth of a Nation – there seemed to be a slew of movies released whose marketing included the implicit and sometimes explicit message that my blackness obligated me to see. My skin color, not my tastes, my own desires. Go because you are black. I rarely go to the movies now (I have internet access is a sufficient explanation), so I need to be excited enough, interested enough in a movie to persuade myself to dish out the dollars. So I was growing increasingly annoyed how I, myself, me who resides underneath this skin was being IGNORED and told to come to the movies in service of others.
    2. Black collectivism demands that you treat others of your ilk like a charity.
    3. Black collectivism speaks of a unspecified, vague explanation that support (my money) is required for “the greater good.” What greater good? To help others grow rich. What good does an individual black person being rich do for the collective? Well, it boosts black people’s image to the wider world – Hmm, ok. It Allegedly it will also benefit other black people because this black company will hire black workers and will spend money in black communities. Well, this would only apply to small mom and pop black businesses – businesses anchored in the black community. But I see the buy black to support other blacks applied to large “black owned” conglomeromates as well- the formerly black owned Carol’s Daughter, . When Tidal attempted to spin a yarn of being black owned I possibly damaged my eyeballs from rolling them so hard. buy black is a comforting pr spin but not really beneficial as well.
    4. Black collectivism is based on non issued promises.
      1. Touchy example-a black person buys a nother black person’s movie tickets to support what a black person is doing. They bought the ticket becuase they had been taught that they were obligated to, that purchase symbolize them holding up their part of the bargain. However it comes out tht the movie director/actor that you bought the ticket to support is a Republican married interracially or is living in some other way that you do not approve of – promises not kept. Queue the outraged social media protests. Stuff the online outrage says I of today. Because the person did not make any explicit promises to you. Accept it or move on.
    5. Black collectivism stuffs you in a box and relies on guilt and shame to keep you there.
      1. certain behaviors such as the music you are suppose to like to the way you dress talk and style your hair