Monthly Archives: December 2016

Saying no to a black collective

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It’s been a twisted road getting here, but after discarding most of my support of feminism, and a generalized SJWism, I have arrived here – turning away from a path of black collectivism.

I’m tired and feel weird even typing this but I want to go on record and well, record this moment. Also, I want to figure out how on earth I got here.

Maybe it as all building up. Saying good bye to one type of collectivism after another (4th wave feminism, SJWism) so it made sense that I also would say good by to black collectivism for brevity let’s say it happened in three phases.

  1. Feeling obligated to support (i.e. spend money on) movies I didn’t want to see.
    1. ┬áRed Tails, 12 Years a Slave, Roots, most recently Birth of a Nation – there seemed to be a slew of movies released whose marketing included the implicit and sometimes explicit message that my blackness obligated me to see. My skin color, not my tastes, my own desires. Go because you are black. I rarely go to the movies now (I have internet access is a sufficient explanation), so I need to be excited enough, interested enough in a movie to persuade myself to dish out the dollars. So I was growing increasingly annoyed how I, myself, me who resides underneath this skin was being IGNORED and told to come to the movies in service of others.
    2. Black collectivism demands that you treat others of your ilk like a charity.
    3. Black collectivism speaks of a unspecified, vague explanation that support (my money) is required for “the greater good.” What greater good? To help others grow rich. What good does an individual black person being rich do for the collective? Well, it boosts black people’s image to the wider world – Hmm, ok. It Allegedly it will also benefit other black people because this black company will hire black workers and will spend money in black communities. Well, this would only apply to small mom and pop black businesses – businesses anchored in the black community. But I see the buy black to support other blacks applied to large “black owned” conglomeromates as well- the formerly black owned Carol’s Daughter, . When Tidal attempted to spin a yarn of being black owned I possibly damaged my eyeballs from rolling them so hard. buy black is a comforting pr spin but not really beneficial as well.
    4. Black collectivism is based on non issued promises.
      1. Touchy example-a black person buys a nother black person’s movie tickets to support what a black person is doing. They bought the ticket becuase they had been taught that they were obligated to, that purchase symbolize them holding up their part of the bargain. However it comes out tht the movie director/actor that you bought the ticket to support is a Republican married interracially or is living in some other way that you do not approve of – promises not kept. Queue the outraged social media protests. Stuff the online outrage says I of today. Because the person did not make any explicit promises to you. Accept it or move on.
    5. Black collectivism stuffs you in a box and relies on guilt and shame to keep you there.
      1. certain behaviors such as the music you are suppose to like to the way you dress talk and style your hair
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