Monthly Archives: May 2014

Recollections of “Belle”

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I just stumbled into the house after seeing a screening of the period piece, “Belle.” 

It’s late,I’m tired,but here are my initial thoughts – may I not regret making my thoughts public in the morning. 

1. Sometimes any publicity is better than no publicity

     I knew nothing about the story about Dido, Bell Lindsey, before seeing the movie, but I was inspired to learn more about her after this viewing. I was on the fence about the upcoming movie about Nina Simone, starring Zoe Saldana.  The choice of actress, the possible,ok likely, fictionalizations that will be made in telling the life story of a real live person. But honestly, Nina Simone was never in the forefront of my consciousness until the announcement of the movie and all of the controservies that have ensued.  

Educating mass audiences – isn’t that what the ultimate goal of many if not most mainstream endeavors are meant to do? 

2. Why has Belle been held up as an achievement/proud role model?

      Wait, wait -the back story for this comment 

I had heard anecdotes, more like brief comments before, about Black aristocrats whispered, stated triumphantly – “And did you know that so and so was a Black aristocrat?”.  

But then I actually witnessed “Belle” and saw a glimpse of what her life was likely like – not allowed to sit with visiting family members for fear that they would be offended by her presence, kept hidden away from the public, not having any cohorts to understand first hand what this type of lifestyle was like, and don’t get me started on seeming impossibility of finding a suitable marriage mate….

She was beautiful. She was dark (for the time period), She was clothed in some of the finest dresses, spoke well, had gracious manners. 

She was lonely. She possibly/likely hated her own skin.  For a good while (until she inherited a fortune), she appeared to be doomed for a life of single hood.  She was only in this position because her father decided to recognize her as his.  Where exactly does Belle’s heroism come in? What makes her character, which was essentially a whimsy of fortune, worthy of the reverence that it has received? 

Right now, late when I am tired and have no energy to spin a good tale about the strength and triumph of the human spirit – I think I heard Belle’s name mentioned so fondly because of her race (representation is important- there is no sarcasm here) and the wealth and glamour of her rank.  Because Blacks are so rarely afforded a dignified role, let alone a beautiful and glamarous one.  I don’t cast any contempt on this view, but I only just now came to appreciate the pain, awkwardness and loneliness and near despair that comes along with being “the Black artistocrat” in a white society. 

3.  Actually about that human spirit

       In the movie, there were a few people, men, who were willing to buck all of society’s traditions and taboos, in order to support Belle.  I would have liked to learn a great deal more about them, what drove them and what their values were. Who and what sort of people who are ahead of their time.  I think it has something to do with being so dedicated to a set of values that you are willing to follow that logic through and express those values in all walks of your life. Walk that walk. 

4.  Sisterhood

     I don’t know what Belle’s views were about other Blacks, but it was a sweet sweet moment getting to see Belle and a Black slave woman (damn shame I can’t remember her name) getting to share screen time, helping each other, being kind to each other.  

5. And about the rest of the movie….

      Eh, it was ok.  Considering that so little is known about the real Dido, and this is largely a work of fiction, I would have hoped that such free reign would inspire a more creative or at least more competent.  Instead kind of typical, bland love, coming of age and big sports event kind of story.  

Oh well, I went for the history not the story, so I wasn’t that disappointed. It was a movie that made me think, just not about what the didatic speeches and quips wanted me to.  Still not bad. 

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Diet books leave me unfulfilled

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I just finished reading “Rethinking thin : the new science of weight loss–and the myths and realities of dieting” by Gina Kolata, and I glanced through “Sugar Busters” before setting it back down. 

Both books – which were marketed towards the mass public – left me with the same impression – “this information again?”

Diet books currently seem to follow the formula of a brief history of dieting (usually Western as most that I’ve read imply that dieting really began with the Banting method), how obesity rates have exploded, the tyranny of American beauty standards, how diets don’t work. The End. Or, here is the diet that really works after all.

The formula is tiresome to me but I keep going back. I realize that I have my own questions about weight loss that just don’t seem to be answered.

Can people change their dietary habits? Why is it so challenging? How are people able to change the way they eat for religious or ethical questions (i.e. vegetarians, keeping kosher, etc)?